The Ott Lab publishes novel research on SARS-CoV-2 variants Read More

Ott Lab News

Nobel Laureate Dr. Jennifer Doudna and Groundbreaking Applications of CRISPR
In 2011, Dr. Jennifer Doudna began studying an enzyme called Cas9. Little did she know, in 2020 she would go on to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry along with Emmanuelle Charpentier for discovering the powerful gene-editing tool, CRISPR-Cas9. Today, Doudna is a decorated researcher, the Li Ka Shing Chancellors Chair, a Professor ...
Learning from vaccines: the race to make antiviral drugs
Cosmos — How RNA technology may tip the balance in our favour when it comes to anti-COVID therapeutics as well as vaccines.
Why is Delta so infectious? New lab tool spotlights little noticed mutation that speeds viral spread
Science — As the world has learned to its cost, the Delta variant of the pandemic coronavirus is more than twice as infectious as previous strains. Just what drives Delta’s ability to spread so rapidly hasn’t been clear, however. Now, a new lab strategy that makes it possible to quickly and safely ...
New Method Sheds Light on Why Some SARS-CoV-2 Variants Are More Infectious
In a new paper published today in the journal Science, researchers at the Innovative Genomics Institute (IGI) at UC Berkeley and Gladstone Institutes used a new method to explore why some variants of SARS-CoV-2, like the Delta variant, are more transmissible and infectious than others. The new study, a collaboration between the labs of ...
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QBI Fireside Chat with Melanie Ott and Mélanie Hamon of Institut Pasteur
The Quantitative Biosciences Institute (QBI) at UCSF presents “Scientific Collaborations Across Borders: QBI/Institut Pasteur: Epigenetic Modifications and Human Pathogenic Viruses,” a QBI Fireside Chat on October 20, 2021 at 10AM PT, co-organized by the Office for Science and Technology of the French Embassy in San Francisco. This “fireside chat” featured ...
Ott Lab is part of a Global Collaboration to find a Cure for HIV
Gladstone Institutes — Now, with a $26.5-million grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a multi-disciplinary group of researchers from institutions around the world is trying a completely new strategy for curing HIV. The group, known as the HIV Obstruction by Programmed Epigenetics (HOPE) Collaboratory, will be led by researchers at Gladstone ...